Missionary eats home-made bread baked miles away

True according to Ted E. Brewerton (but not verified)

bread-ldsThis legend usually involves a missionary from the early days of the Church, but people have also heard it said about a more recent missionary. In either case, the legend starts out with a woman (mom or wife) baking bread. She wraps the bread in a dish cloth and places it on a windowsill to cool. When she comes back for the bread, it and the cloth are gone. Months later, her son/husband returns from a mission and as he unpacks his bags, she sees the dish cloth. She asks him where he got it and he says that there was a day that he had nothing to eat so he prayed and later found a loaf of bread wrapped in that dish cloth.

Although there are many variations on this story, it is based on events that have been recorded. Elder Ted E. Brewerton of the Seventy wrote an article in the New Era in November 1990 called “Miracles”. In this article he talks about his grandfather, James E. Fisher, who served a mission in New Zealand in 1892 and experienced the event described above.

Missionary eats home-made bread
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6 thoughts on “Missionary eats home-made bread

  • November 5, 2018 at 4:20 am
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    Elder Brewerton writes of James E. Fisher my great-grandfather. I know the veracity of the story because it was shared in the family as I grew up. I had a somewhat similar food-related experience as a missionary in Brazil. Without going into a lot of detail, at the time, missionary funds were not dispersed in an organized manner each month like they are now. Neither was there an organized “feed the missionaries” program nor a lot of members to feed us. We received our funds from our family directly and paid all our own expenses. One month, because of great growth, my companion and I had to travel to most of our missionary zone of 5 cities several times during the month of which the furthest was 136 miles away. These financial expenses would not allow us any funds for food. We took our problem to the Lord. He answered our prayer by speaking scripture to us. We went forth in faith and had meals provided to us for breakfast, lunch, and dinner no matter what city we were visiting for the entire month. Not quite the dramatic miracle of my great-grandfather; however, it was an incredible miracle none-the-less and not repeated, nor was it necessary, the rest of my mission.

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  • November 3, 2018 at 6:22 am
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    Holy Fetch,
    You may think this story about the loaf of bread is an urban legend (and the changed versions of it truly are) but the actual story is not an urban legend. I used to own Ancestral Research Center in Salt Lake. One of our employees, Richard Shipp was hired to help people write their history. As a part of our business he interviewed elderly people to help them write their life’s story. One of the women who he interviewed was 85 years old. She was present when her uncle came home from his mission and told that story of him receiving a warm loaf of bread from a stranger. She was there and heard her uncle and his missionary companion relate that story and heard her aunt then tell how she had baked the bread and the white linen cloth they had with them that the stranger gave them the bread wrapped in was her linen cloth that she had wrapped the bread in. Later when I lived in NC I met her grandson and he said he too had heard his grandmother tell that story as well. It was not something she heard someone else tell. There may be people who have heard the story and then retold it like the whispering game changing the details they do not remember. But the actual story is not an urban legend.
    Cordell Vail

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  • August 5, 2017 at 3:10 pm
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    I heard this story in the early 1990’s. An elder from Calgary was serving in Prince Albert, Sask. A friend brought homemade bread to him straight from his Mom’s oven and it was still warm. It’s 7 ish hours so kind of unlikely

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    • November 4, 2018 at 6:01 pm
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      Sometime after returning from his mission to New Zealand, James E. Fisher moved his family from central Utah to Raymond, Alberta, Canada near Calgary. He was a wheat farmer and helped settle the area in the early 1900s.

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  • July 31, 2017 at 3:20 am
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    I read about a detailed version of this story in the book called “No greater love” (and other stories). I don’t know who the author is but the details are really good. It talks about how three men showed up at the door of the lady and ask if she would give them food for doing yard work. She gave them work to do and while they worked she baked the bread for them. When they were though she gave them the loaf of bread with the cloth and, well… you know the rest.

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  • October 20, 2016 at 6:15 am
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    It would be more believable if it was about Krispy Kreme donuts…

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